BA Technique #21: Focus Group

Conduct structured sessions to gather a target audience's insights, opinions, and feedback.

Erivan de Sena Ramos

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Photo by DCP on Unsplash

Hey there, BAs of the world! We're back with another captivating Business Analysis technique from The BABOK Guide v3. Get ready to immerse yourselves in the power of collective wisdom through the engaging technique of Focus Groups. We can use this to facilitate dynamic discussions, gather diverse perspectives, and extract valuable insights to drive impactful analysis. Let's jump right in!

What is this technique about?

In the 1940s, Focus groups emerged as a research method for market research. Later, Robert K. Merton used focus groups during World War II to study the effectiveness of propaganda. However, Focus groups only gained popularity in the 1980s, used by psychologists and marketing experts.

The Focus Group technique involves bringing together a selected group of stakeholders or subject matter experts in a structured and facilitated setting. Through interactive discussions and collaborative exercises, valuable information and insights are obtained, enabling business analysts to gather diverse perspectives and make informed decisions.

How to apply this technique?

To apply the Focus Group technique in your Business Analysis, consider the following suggested steps:

  1. Define the Objective — Clearly define the purpose and objective of the Focus Group. Identify the specific topics, questions, or issues to be addressed.
  2. Select the Participants — Identify and invite diverse stakeholders with relevant knowledge, expertise, and perspectives. Ensure the group represents various roles, departments, or customer segments, depending on the focus of the analysis.
  3. Plan the Session — Develop an agenda and plan for the Focus Group session, including the duration, location, and required materials. Prepare discussion guides, questionnaires, or interactive activities to guide the conversation and elicit valuable insights.
  4. Facilitate the Session — Begin by setting the context, explaining the purpose, and establishing clear ground rules for participation. Encourage open and…

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Erivan de Sena Ramos

Business Analysis & Requirements Engineering enthusiast. Information Systems & Software Engineering specialist. MBA in PM & HR. CBAP, PMP, CSM, ITIL & COBIT