BA Technique #24: Interface Analysis

Identifying and defining the interactions and dependencies between components, systems, or stakeholders

Erivan de Sena Ramos

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Photo by DCP on Unsplash

Hi there, my amazing BAs! We're back with another powerful Business Analysis technique from The BABOK Guide v3. Brace yourselves for a deep exploration of system interactions and interdependencies with the captivating technique of Interface Analysis. It can help Business Analysts unravel the interfaces' intricacies, assess compatibility, and optimize the flow of information for seamless analysis. Here we go!

What is this technique about?

Interface term originated from engineering design and modeling, which denote the shared boundary between systems.

In Business Analysis, Interface Analysis is a technique that analyses the connections, interactions, and data exchanges between various interfaces within or between different systems. It enables Business Analysts to deeply understand how information flows, how components communicate, and how other systems integrate.

How to apply this technique?

To effectively apply the Interface Analysis technique in your Business Analysis, consider the following steps:

  1. Identify the Interfaces: Identify the interfaces of your analysis, such as system interfaces, user interfaces, or data interfaces. Understand the purpose and context of each interface and its significance in the overall system or process.
  2. Analyze Interface Requirements: Gather and document the requirements associated with each interface. Identify the data elements, formats, protocols, and standards that must be adhered to for successful interface implementation.
  3. Assess Compatibility and Integration: Evaluate different interfaces' compatibility and integration ability. Identify potential gaps or conflicts regarding data formats, protocols, or system dependencies.
  4. Document Interface Specifications: Document the specifications and details of each interface, including input/output requirements, data mappings, and error handling mechanisms. Use visual representations, such as interface diagrams or flowcharts, to provide a clear overview…

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Erivan de Sena Ramos

Business Analysis & Requirements Engineering enthusiast. Information Systems & Software Engineering specialist. MBA in PM & HR. CBAP, PMP, CSM, ITIL & COBIT