BA Technique #35: Process Modeling

Creating visual representations, such as flowcharts or swimlane diagrams, to illustrate how business processes work and their interactions

Erivan de Sena Ramos

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Photo by DCP on Unsplash

Listen up, BAs! It’s time to unravel the mysteries of Process Modeling, a captivating Business Analysis technique from The BABOK Guide v3. Brace yourselves to dive deep into the realm of visual representation and analysis of processes. By creating process models, Business Analysts can optimize system design and analysis outcomes, leading to improved efficiency and effectiveness. Without further ado, let’s get right into it!

What is this technique about?

The concept of Process Modeling stems from different fields such as systems engineering, industrial engineering, and business process management. It was developed to address the necessity of tracking and illustrating the sequence of tasks, decisions, and exchanges involved in business processes. Nowadays, Business Analysts use Process Modeling as a valuable tool for scrutinizing and enhancing processes, as well as conveying process-related details efficiently.

How to apply this technique?

Here are some suggested steps to apply this technique in Business Analysis:

  1. Identify the Objective: Clearly define the purpose and objective of the process analysis. Determine what aspects of the process you are aiming to understand, improve, or optimize.
  2. Gather Process Information: Collect relevant data and information about the process. This can involve conducting interviews, reviewing documentation, and observing the process in action to gain a thorough understanding of how it currently operates.
  3. Map the Process: Create a visual representation of the process flow, documenting the sequence of activities, decision points, inputs, outputs, and interactions with stakeholders or systems. Use process mapping techniques such as flowcharts, swimlane diagrams, or value stream maps.
  4. Analyze Process Steps: Analyze each step of the process to identify inefficiencies, bottlenecks, or areas for improvement. Look for redundant activities, unnecessary handoffs, delays, or other…

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Erivan de Sena Ramos

Business Analysis & Requirements Engineering enthusiast. Information Systems & Software Engineering specialist. MBA in PM & HR. CBAP, PMP, CSM, ITIL & COBIT